Efficacy of phototherapy to treat facial ageing when using a red versus an amber LED: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Abstract

Introduction The skin undergoes morphological and physiological changes with the advancing age of an individual. These changes may be caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute to cellular ageing and consequent skin ageing. The term photoageing is used to characterise the ageing of the skin caused by solar radiation. Clinically, the skin becomes more flaccid, thicker and hyperpigmented, while there is an early appearance of wrinkles and other skin changes, such as skin cancer. Nowadays, there are numerous treatments for ageing skin, and one of them is with the use of phototherapy, which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The objective of this study will be to evaluate the percentages of reduction in the volume of periocular wrinkles when treated with red and amber LEDs.

Discussion

Photobiomodulation has been extensively studied for wound healing in the medical literature, showing good results.33–35 The effect is related to the increased proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, collagen synthesis, decrease of the inflammatory cells and formation of granulation tissue. The use of both LED and lasers has been considered effective.36 37 Recently, some studies proposed the use of phototherapy in aesthetics protocols for rejuvenation.15 38 However, it is still needed to optimise phototherapy parameters such as energy and the number of sessions.39

 

LINK to full article: https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/5/e021419

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